Does the bird think upon the vastness of the sky, or does he just fly?


Often we are guilty of positioning our thoughts upon our winged imaginations, feeling as if we don’t have a stable branch to land upon in the climate of this world. I am no different than most who tend to overthink situations which don’t go as planned, wound our human spirit, or make us question why people act the way they do (or not like us).


In overthinking the “why” people act a certain way, we can turn their behavior into our behavioral problems: our obstructions, our insecurities, and our anxieties. This has the potential to become an exhausting, weighty burden; which, if done through our own limited eyes, will most certainly dull the perception of both “us” and “them.” We bear the risk of altering ourselves in shadow thinking, redefining humanity as “us” versus “them.” In turn, we do ourselves the worst disservice of all: we become more and more like the very people we try to resemble less and less. Eventually, there becomes a new “we” – and the “we” is irritated, selfish, and judgmental.


Just fly.


“Look at the birds of the air; they do not sow or reap or store away in barns, and yet your heavenly Father feeds them. Are you not much more valuable than they? Can any one of you by worrying add a single hour to your life?” (Matthew 6:26-27).


May we not fight ourselves so much in trying to be right and fight the world around us that all we end up doing is beating the wind and exhausting our free will in an effort to find something only Christ can give us: peace for our souls… now and for eternity.


“Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you and learn from me, for I am gentle and humble in heart, and you will find rest for your souls” (Matthew 11:28-29).


Trust Christ to provide: to provide the proper wisdom, the measure of faith needed, and the right time. Trust Christ to also provide his strength, his presence, and his peace for the journey. And trust Christ to be right, regardless of what the world says, what your feelings beg of you, and no matter how big the sky appears against your wings.


Christ does not call us to trust the sky, friend. No. Christ calls us to trust the Creator of the sky! (Psalm 33:4-6, 1 Chronicles 16:11, Isaiah 40:28-31.)


Christ does not ask us to figure it all out… the depth or the width of each person… the why or the why not of each circumstance. If we tried to figure out that which we do not understand, we would be left sorely disappointed, bitterly frustrated, and acting upon rumored judgments and faulty imaginations. Instead, Christ desires for us to trust him: to replace our doubts and fears with full-on faith.


“So do not fear, for I am with you; do not be dismayed, for I am your God.


I will strengthen you and help you; I will uphold you with my righteous right hand” (Isaiah 41:10).


Does the bird think upon the vastness of the sky, or does he just fly?


May you have full-on faith this week. And may you just fly.


SGLY, dear readers.


(Smile, God Loves You.)


Tiffany Kaye Chartier is a Christian author and opinion columnist. You can find her newly released books, “H.E.R.O. Faith” and “Bad Disciples” on Amazon. To submit feedback on SGLY, please contact news@amtrib. com. Follow Chartier on Facebook: facebook. com/ tiffanychartier and Twitter : @tiffanychartier